Graduate Program Course Descriptions

Undergraduate Course Descriptions

MFA-1   •   MFA-2   •  MPS-H  •   MPS-L   •   MPS-S

MFA-1

098 MFA-1 Workshop

This non-credit workshop is required for all prospective students accepted into the MFA-1 program without a portfolio that graphically demonstrates their technical and creative abilities in the fine or applied arts. Students are introduced to the language and principles of art and design through museum visits, freehand drawing, model making, and other exercises in visual communication. Participants will acquire a basic understanding of the principles of design and composition and will be exposed to the use of various graphic media in black-and-white and color.

501 HISTORICAL STYLES I
Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This course is an introductory overview of the history of design in furniture, interiors, and architecture from the ancient world through 1820. Using a blended format of online lectures and a combination of group discussions and field trips to major collections, students will be introduced to the development of major forms, period styles, and ornament from ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome through the Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, and Neoclassical eras.

502 HISTORICAL STYLES II
Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 501 or 640

The second half of the introductory survey, this course uses a blended format and focuses on the history of Western furniture, interiors, and architecture in the 19th and 20th centuries considered within the cultural context of each period. Styles examined include 19th century revival styles, Arts and Crafts, Art Deco, European and American Modernism, the International Style and Postmodernism.

506 EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING I
Lecture Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 538

This required course provides MFA-1 students a unique opportunity to extend their interior design education beyond the classroom in a distance learning setting through planning, implementing, and assessing a learning experience of their choice. In consultation with their instructor, students will select one of two options: mentor- guided internship, or independent study. In addition to design-related independent study, this option also includes study travel or community service/service learning. Students must submit a detailed proposal for review and approval by the instructor prior to the start of the summer session. Students are required to do readings, actively participate in a weekly discussion board, and submit a final reflective essay, along with other option-specific deliverables.

514 INTRODUCTION TO SUSTAINABILITY & THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT
Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This survey course introduces students to the principles and concepts of sustainability and provides the context for design decisions for the 21st century. Students will develop an understanding of why current and future makers of the built environment must think differently than in the past and the reasons for both historical and current concerns about resource limitations. Class lectures will explore differing interpretations of the concept of sustainability and the broad range of factors contributing to a sustainable society, including, health, productivity, biomimicry, passive design strategy, material re-use and resource conservation. Guest lecturers will include experts in the field of sustainable softgoods, hardgoods, lighting, daylighting, environmental systems, LEED, and BIM.

517 DESIGN AND DRAWING I
Studio Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This course introduces students to a range of traditional and digital tools and techniques for exploring and expressing their design ideas. Topics include hand sketching and an introduction to software, including a computer-aided drafting program, a 3D image-modeling program, and an image-editing program, such as Adobe Photoshop.

519 TEXTILES FOR INTERIORS
Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This course is a survey of the history and science of fabrics through lectures on major decorative arts periods as well as textile design, fibers, methods of weaving, dyeing, flammability, finishes and trims. Properties, code requirements, and maintenance of contract and residential fabrics and their application are covered as well as estimating yardage. Also included in the course are lectures on the history of wallpaper and carpeting and their application to today's interiors.

527 DESIGN AND DRAWING II
Studio Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 517

Building on the skills acquired in Design & Drawing I, assignments will reinforce and extend students' knowledge of and facility with hand and computer-based drawing. Along with hand-rendering techniques, graphic design software such as Adobe Illustrator and InDesign, and rendering software such as VRay for SketchUp, will be used throughout the process of designing a small-scale project, from concept generation through final design presentation.

528 INTERIOR DESIGN STUDIO I
Studio Credits: 4, No prerequisites

Students are introduced to the abstract language and principles common to all visual activity. Discussion and critique of assigned projects enable students to develop an understanding of the 2D- and 3D- elements of design—point, line, plane, shape/form, value, color, and texture—along with the principles which unify these elements in a clear visual conceptual organization. The project sequence also introduces students to the fundamental stages of designing interior space - including concept development, programming, diagramming, and schematic planning.

530 CODES
Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 517

An introduction to building codes and legal regulations as they relate to interior design work is presented. Discussions cover building codes, the process of code development and revision, and the responsibilities of interior designers in incorporating code requirements in their work. Essential sections of the building code, such as egress, occupancy levels, regulations for the handicapped, general accessibility requirements, finish and material specifications and fire ratings, are included.

538 INTERIOR DESIGN STUDIO II
Studio Credits: 4, Prerequisites: 528

Through studio projects, lectures, and discussions, this course provides an introduction to the design of the residential environment. Projects range in scale from the design of a single room to the design of a multi-room residence. Students are introduced to the design process, programming, the selection of furniture, fabrics, and finishes, space planning, and the preparation of professional presentations.

541 COLOR FOR INTERIORS
Studio Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This studio course concentrates on the study of color and color schemes for interiors. Compilation of the Munsell Color Charts is the basis for a series of projects which lead to the development of complete color schemes. Psychological and practical influences affecting the choice of color are studied. Using gouache paints, colors for walls, floor coverings, window treatments, upholstery, accessories, and accent areas are selected and applied to a variety of room settings.

587 MATERIALS & METHODS OF CONSTRUCTION
Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 517

Through observation and analysis, students will develop an understanding of the importance of interior construction methods, materials, finishes, and details. Students become familiar with the application of a wide variety of building materials through lectures, presentations, site visits, and the preparation of construction details.

591 CURRICULAR PRACTICAL TRAINING
Credits: 1

Curricular Practical Training allows graduate students to gain practical training working in a professional design office in the United States. This professional experience is directly applicable to the study of interior design. Students are required to keep a journal, recording their observations and reflections on the work environment, and on their experiences. Students must provide a letter of invitation from the prospective employer/firm to their academic advisor and to the International Student Services Specialist (ISSS) stating the proposed weekly schedule, the salary, if any, the responsibilities and expectations for the position, and other required information. This course is limited to international students studying at the graduate level. It may be taken a maximum of three (3) times. All international students must comply with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security guidelines and policies. Students must provide all required documents to the NYSID ISSS and to the academic advisor for their written approvals prior to beginning the training. The training may be paid or unpaid. Students enrolled in 591 may not work until the I-20 has been issued by the ISSS. Although the U.S. Department of Homeland Security policies may change at any time, as of 2016, students must have completed one full academic year (fall and spring semesters) in order to enroll in this course. International students are limited to 11 months of CPT if they plan to continue to OPT after graduation. Students taking this course in the summer session may work 40 hours/week; students taking this course in the Fall or Spring may work for a maximum of 20 hours/week. NYSID considers all CPT to be fulltime. All CPT must fall within the dates of the semesters, or other dates as determined by the International Student Services Specialist (ISSS) and posted on the NYSID portal and in other locations.

601 MODERN ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN I
Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 502 or 640

The sources of modern architecture and design are explored are explored from the 18th century designers Adam, Soane, and Ledoux through the 19th century and the work of the eclectic architects. The course examines how architects used stylistic elements of the past and adapted them to solve modern design problems. Each revival style is traced to the original era to explore the meaning of the adaptations. Through research and analysis, student develop awareness of historical precedents as the historical basis of modern designs and analyze the key formal and decorative attributes of the built environment.

602 MODERN ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN II
Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 601 or 640

The second part of the overview of modern architecture, this course focuses on the period 1890 to the present in Europe and America. Styles and movements covered include the American Beaux Arts, the Chicago School, Art Nouveau, Vienna Secession, Futurism, Expressionism, Art Moderne, the Modern Movement, and Post-Modernism.

606 EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING II II
Lecture Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 618

This required course provides MFA-1 students with a further opportunity to extend their interior design education and project management and planning skills beyond the classroom, in a mentored distance-learning setting. In consultation with their instructor, students will select one of two options: mentor-guided internship, or independent study. In addition to design-related independent study, this option also includes study travel or community service/service learning. Students must submit a detailed proposal for review and approval by the instructor prior to the start of the summer session. Students are required to do readings, actively participate in a weekly discussion board, and submit a final reflective essay, along with other option-specific deliverables.

608 INTERIOR DESIGN STUDIO III
Studio Credits: 4, Prerequisites: 538

Building on the skills and knowledge acquired in ID Studio II, this course focuses on the design of workplace and retail environments, such as offices and boutiques. Students will develop their skills in research, programming, space planning, the selection of finishes, and the arrangement and selection of furnishings. Students will also learn the role and application of building codes to interior spaces and the technical skills required for more advanced presentations.

617 BUILDING SYSTEMS
Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 587, 530

A study of the materials and methods of plumbing, HVAC, fire protection, lighting, and electrical systems in relation to interior architecture and design. Through research and analysis, students become aware of the impact of materials, construction methods, and building systems on the built environment and develop an understanding of the relationships between codes, sustainability, culture, and human-environment interaction.

618 INTERIOR DESIGN STUDIO IV
Studio Credits: 4, Prerequisites: 608

Projects involving diverse or special populations, such as children, the aged, or the disabled, present a design challenge. Students research case studies, project types, and relevant environment and behavior theory. Emphasis is placed on the development of a comprehensive solution using innovative and appropriate conceptual approaches. Students will further develop and refine their ability to express their ideas graphically and verbally, and to increase their proficiency in handling three-dimensional space.

628 INTERIOR DESIGN STUDIO V
Studio Credits: 4, Prerequisites: 618

This course focuses on the design of hospitality environments, such as restaurants and hotels. This advanced studio requires students to integrate and synthesize the skills and knowledge gained throughout their studies to create a comprehensive project, including presentation drawings, models, material and furniture boards, detail drawings and specifications.

631 KITCHEN AND BATH DESIGN
Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 608, 636

This course is an in-depth introduction to the planning and design of kitchens and baths in residential and commercial applications. Design projects emphasize issues of accessibility and universal design, modularity, safety, manufactured products and appliances, materials, and industry standards. Space planning and construction details are emphasized. Students will understand sustainability and environmental impact as it applies to the design and construction of custom kitchens and baths, including appliances, cabinetry, surfacing, and applied finishes.

633 LIGHTING I
Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 538

Students are introduced to basic technical and creative concepts in lighting interior spaces, with emphasis on the architectural aspects of lighting design. Human factors, floor planning, color, materials, and the behavior of light are discussed, along with lamps, fixtures, layout, and circuiting. Students work on studio projects and develop interior lighting plans and specifications. Through research and analysis students will develop an understanding of the relationship of light to the various elements of the built environment and its role in protecting the health, safety, and welfare of the end-user.

634 ADVANCED DETAILING
Studio Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 631

Millwork detailing is explored as applied to architectural interiors. The projects focus on the development of design and drawing skills related to paneling, built-in cabinetry, staircases, and other specialties. Through research and analysis, students develop an understanding of the importance of the selection and specification of materials and construction methods to the functional and aesthetic quality of architectural woodwork and the interior environment.

635 THEORY OF THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT
Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 642

This seminar is an in-depth analysis of the relationship between theory, practice, and socio-historical considerations in architecture and interior design. Beginning with a discussion of the various approaches to and functions of “theory,” both traditional and critical, the course focuses on a close reading of major primary texts of architecture and design theory. The relationship between these theories and the built works they inform will be analyzed in their appropriate historical and critical contexts. Through lecture and discussion of assigned readings, the course will stress the importance of theory for the achievement of a socially appropriate and responsible design.

636 CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS
Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 527, 587

This course introduces students to the preparation of construction documents using Revit. Students will gain an overview of construction drawing formats and conventions, while learning to develop the plans, elevations, sections, and details that form part of a set of interior design working drawings for a small commercial or residential project.

639 ADVANCED GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS I
Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 636

Building on 636 Construction Documents, students explore the use of digital drawing software, such as Revit, as a design and presentation tool. Three-dimensional modeling techniques and lighting, color, texture, and material assignments will be used to create compelling and realistic renderings.

641 INTERIOR DESIGN PRACTICE
Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 608

This course focuses on the business, legal, financial, managerial, and ethical considerations of interior design practice. Topics include working with vendors, workrooms, contractors, consultants, the order process, project management, and working with clients, as well as the important issue of legal recognition of the profession and licensing of the interior designers.

642 MFA-1 THESIS PREPARATION
Studio Credits: 2, Co-requisite: 628

This research-based course lays the foundation for the thesis project to be executed in the following semester. In consultation with the instructor, students will select an appropriate project type, conduct research including case studies, identify relevant environment-behavior research, select a site, prepare base building drawings, and write a detailed project statement and program.

643 LIGHTING II
Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 633

The goal of this course is to expand upon the skills and vocabulary of lighting knowledge gained in Lighting I by applying them to solve design problems in architectural lighting projects. Course lectures familiarize the student with lighting design strategies, graphics, and circuiting techniques, creation of specification booklets and basic dimming systems as well as specialty topics such as decorative luminaires and energy efficiency. The influence of lighting on color and related psychological effects are explored.

644 FURNITURE DESIGN
Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 628, 634

This design studio focuses on the aesthetic and functional issues related to the creation of custom freestanding furniture. The process of designing furniture prototypes from the initial articulation of design objectives to the technical exploration of their manufacture, including analysis of the environmental impact of the object, will be explored. Discussions and assignments lead to the design of three original furniture prototypes, one of which is required to be developed using the metric system.

646 ADVANCED GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS II
Studio Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 639

In this studio, students learn how to use more advanced digital rendering software. The workflow process between applications will be explained. Advanced modeling and particle systems will be introduced, and photo-realistic renderings will be fully developed. Techniques for producing a 2D/3D animation of an interior space will also be explored.

648 MFA-1 THESIS
Studio Credits: 4, Prerequisites: 642

The thesis is the final interior design studio project of the MFA- program. Students implement the project that was identified and researched in the Thesis Preparation course. All phases of a professional project are explored: research, programming, analysis of existing conditions, design criteria, concept development, schematic and detailed presentation drawings, models, material boards, and selected details. The course culminates in a formal presentation and critique by a jury of professionals and all projects are exhibited in the annual thesis exhibition.

680 INDEPENDENT STUDY
Studio Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 506 or 650

This course option allows the experienced student with a 3.5 GPA or better and 30 completed credits to create an individual program of study with a faculty member. Students are required to present an outline of their intended study to the program director and OAA for approval prior to registration.

690 ADVANCED INTERNSHIP
Variable Credits: 2 or 3, Prerequisites: 618

This course offers elective academic credit for college-monitored work experience, and is open to students matriculated in the third year of the MFA-1 and the first year of the MFA-2 degree programs and who have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0. It is designed to build on skills already learned in the classroom and to acquire new ones. Students have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice and, in doing so, gain professional experience. An internship for 3 credits consists of 240 hours of contact time at the job placement site. An internship for 2 credits consists of 160 hours of contact time at the job placement site. Grading is Pass/Fail only.at the job placement site. Students may take no more than one internship for credit towards their degree. Grading is pass/fail only.

 

MFA-2

612 PRODUCT DESIGN
Studio Credits: 3, No prerequisites

This studio explores the marketing, psychology, conceptualization, and design of products commonly found in interiors, from tableware to telephones.

613 LIGHTING DESIGN
Studio Credits: 3, No prerequisites

A formal introduction to architectural lighting design for students with experience in architecture and/or interior design. Students are introduced to basic technical and creative concepts in lighting interior spaces. Vision, perception, color, lamps, fixtures, layout, and dimming/control of light are all discussed. Students work on a studio project and develop interior lighting plans and specifications.

614 SET DESIGN
Studio Credits: 3, No prerequisites

This course introduces the related discipline of set design. Students will utilize their previously acquired knowledge, technical skills, and creativity to investigate the issues and techniques involved in designing for the theater, television, and film.

615 RETAIL DESIGN
Studio Credits: 3, No prerequisites

This design studio focuses on advanced problems in store planning and design. Course projects range in scale from small retail environments to advanced merchandising for department stores. Students learn about programming, space utilization, fixtures and display, as well as the role the interior designer plays in establishing the image and visual identity of a retailer.

621 OFFICE DESIGN
Lecture credits 3

This course traces the development of the design of the office workplace, the single biggest specialty in contract interior design. Beginning with the rise of commerce and banking, progressing through the revolution in technology, downsizing, and globalization, students examine the interdisciplinary contributions by interior designers, architects, industrial designers, real estate and development firms, bankers, and business users.

622 GREEN DESIGN
Studio Credits: 3, No prerequisites

Interior designers and architects have become increasingly responsible for formulating environmentally responsible design solutions. In this course, students learn to incorporate parameters for energy reduction, health, and sustainable construction and finish materials, HVAC, lighting, recycling, and cost payback into the research and completion of one or more "green" design projects.

623 FURNITURE DESIGN
Studio Credits: 3, No prerequisites

This course focuses on the process of designing furniture prototypes from the initial articulation of design objectives to the technical exploration of their manufacture. Discussions and assignments lead to the design of three original furniture prototypes.

624 HOSPITALITY DESIGN
Studio Credits: 3, No prerequisites

In this course, students undertake a design project that develops a restaurant or hotel interior. Discussion topics covered include: the growth of tourist industries; the impact of changing economic conditions and public tastes; and the planning and furnishing of hotels and restaurants.

625 EXHIBITION DESIGN
Studio Credits: 3, No prerequisites

A successful exhibit generates interest and excitement about its subject matter. This course focuses on the special challenge of designing an appropriate exhibition for a gallery, museum, trade show, convention, or showroom.

640 DESIGN STUDIO I
Studio Credits: 6, No prerequisites

The objective of this studio is to focus conceptually and analytically on the manipulation of interior space using a contemporary program in a historical context. Students will analyze a landmarked building and develop a design that accommodates a program of new uses.

645 HISTORY AND THEORY OF INTERIOR DESIGN: THE CLASSICAL TRADITION
Lecture Credits: 4, No prerequisites

This research seminar is an in-depth analysis of the classical tradition in architecture and interior design from Versailles to Post-Modern classicism. Students will read primary theoretical texts, give an oral presentation and develop a research paper on an aspect or work of classical design. Students will be instructed in how to conduct advanced scholarly research and write formal analyses of buildings and interiors.

647 SOCIOLOGY OF THE DOMESTIC INTERIOR
Lecture credits 3

This seminar analyzes the factors that shape domestic interiors from Ancient Greece to Post-Modernism. A variety of sources of meaning for each period will be examined including language of furniture, social factors, power, prestige, gender issues, the role of childhood, and technological advances.

650 DESIGN STUDIO II
Studio credits 6

The subject of this studio is a comprehensive and detailed design of interior spaces within a modern building shell, such as a residential condominium, office building, airport, or shopping mall. Students analyze the complex relationships among tenants, developers, architects, engineers, interior designers, and others in the planning and implementation of tenant projects within such structures.

651 LANDSCAPE DESIGN
Studio credits 3

This studio explores the concepts, principles, and methods of landscape design with special focus on the relationships between landscape and interior design. Students will develop a studio project that relates interior and exterior space through the discourse of landscaping and plant design.

655  HISTORY AND THEORY OF INTERIOR DESIGN II:MODERN TRADITION
Lecture credits 4

This seminar analyzes the modernist and avant-garde traditions in architecture and interior design. Emphasis is on the critical reading and in-class discussion of the major writings on modern design theory and criticism from the Gothic Revival and the Arts and Crafts to Free-Form Modernism. Students will develop research topics into a final paper dealing with the relationship between modern theory and practice.

656 SOCIOLOGY OF THE CONTEMPORARY ENVIRONMENT
Lecture credits 3

This seminar explores the relationship of contemporary interior and architectural design and their subtle sociological and psychological effects on the general public. The changing environment is examined in relation to innate human response, weighing the influences of technology, communication, workplace, and mega-structures against the collective psyche.

660 DIRECTED THESIS RESEARCH
Studio credits 3

In consultation with faculty, students select challenging subjects that relate to issues in the world of design today. Each student conducts systematic research and analyzes ideas that become the foundation for the Thesis Studio (670).

665 HISTORY AND THEORY OF AESTHETICS
Lecture credits 3

This seminar focuses on the history and theory of aesthetics from the late 17th century writings of Claude Perrault to the Surrealist manifestos of the 20th century. Writers covered include the Germans Baumgarten, Kant and Hegel; the French theorists Laugier, Boullée, and Breton; the English authors Hogarth, Wordsworth, Burke, Price, and Ruskin. Emphasis is on an analysis of major aesthetic categories (the Beautiful, the Sublime, the Picturesque, the Exotic, the Surreal) and their relationship to actual works of art and design, past and present.

670 THESIS STUDIO
Studio credits 8

The thesis is a culminating interior design project requiring a comprehensive solution to a stated design problem of the student’s choice. This capstone experience involves advanced exploration of pertinent theoretical issues and is based on systematic research and analysis.

680 INDEPENDENT STUDY
Variable credit

This course option allows the experienced student with a 3.5 GPA or better to create an individual program of study with a faculty member. Students are required to present an outline of their intended study to their faculty advisor and coordinator of the graduate program for approval prior to registration.

690 ADVANCED INTERNSHIP
Variable credit 2 or 3; Elective

The NYSID internship program offers elective academic credit for college-monitored work experience. Internships for credit are available to students matriculated in the second year of the MFA-2 degree program who have a cumulative GPA of 3.00. It is designed to help students build on skills already learned in the classroom and to acquire new ones. Students have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice and to gain professional experience. An internship for 3 credits consists of 240 hours of contact time at the job placement site. An internship for 2 credits consists of 160 hours of contact time at the job placement site. Students may take no more than one internship for credit towards their degree. Grading is pass/fail only.

 

MPS in Healthcare Interior Design

710 SURVEY OF HEALTHCARE ENVIRONMENTS
Lecture Credits: 3, No prerequisites

Students will be introduced to current planning and design considerations for healthcare facilities. Conducted as a series of professional seminars examining overall planning and design considerations, and a detailed study of specific care areas, such as oncology, surgery, pediatrics, and others.

711 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS
Lecture Credits: 3, No prerequisites

Designers of healthcare environments must understand the research methods used in evidence-based design, which complement 0nce-based medicine. In this course, students will explore alternate research methodologies and their philosophical and epistemological foundations.

712 THE BUSINESS OF HEALTHCARE
Lecture Credits: 3, No prerequisites

Past and current models of healthcare organizations and project types will be reviewed, along with an analysis of the different corporate structures, hierarchies, and roles common to various healthcare organizations.

715 HISTORY & THEORY OF HEALTHCARE
Lecture Credits: 3, No prerequisites

This course examines the history and range of theories on the relationships between human beings, their health and well-being and the design of the physical setting for care. Students will be introduced to the connections between medical thought, health-care delivery and health facility design at different historical periods, and across different cultures and societies.

719 MATERIALS, TEXTILES, AND FURNISHINGS FOR HEALTHCARE SETTINGS
Lecture Credits: 3, No prerequisites

Materials, finishes, and furnishings play a big role in the perception of specialized healthcare interiors by patients, practitioners, and families. Through this course, students will learn how to specify these elements on the basis of performance, environment-behavior findings, life-cycle, and maintenance.

720 HEALTHCARE STUDIO I
Studio Credits: 3, No prerequisites

Students will understand the technical and aesthetic development of healthcare projects and spaces of varying sizes and scope. Knowledge from previous classes will be applied to the design solution. Students from a non-design healthcare background will work together to learn basic drawing and design skills and concepts, and will approach a design problem(s) from the vantage point of a future administrator or client/ client representative; students with a design background will complete the same project, interfacing with their healthcare colleagues.

721 APPLIED RESEARCH METHODS
Lecture Credits: 3, No prerequisites

Students will design and implement one small research project. They will present their findings in the form of a paper, and poster or PowerPoint presentation typically presented at academic conferences.

722 BUILDING SYSTEMS FOR HEALTHCARE
Lecture Credits: 3, No prerequisites

Healthcare settings require by code, custom, and practice specific building systems. This course is an in-depth examination of the special mechanical systems used in hospitals and other care environments.

730 HEALTHCARE STUDIO II
Studio Credits: 3, No prerequisites

Studio course focused on the planning and design of key areas within an academic medical center or hospital within an urban context preceded by an analysis of hospital structures.

731 PROGRAMMING FOR HEALTHCARE ENVIRONMENTS
Lecture Credits: 3, No prerequisites

Programming is a predesign process that is used to determine the needs of end-users at every organizational level. Then, through post-occupancy evaluations (POEs), designers are able to evaluate the designed environment to determine its success in meeting the needs of the end-users and how well the initial program was met. This course will introduce the practice of programming and post-occupancy evaluation for interior environments, specifically for healthcare.

 

MPS in Interior Lighting Design

723 DAYLIGHTING STUDIO
Studio Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This course focuses on the analysis, evaluation, and manipulation of daylight, and its effects on the design and success of constructed environments. Through physical study models, students will learn methods of forecasting the infiltration of daylight and its impact on design and planning, selection of materials, and size, shape, and location of fenestration. Energy aspects such as site orientation, heat gain, solar transmission, passive solar design, and photovoltaics are also explored.

724 EVOLUTION OF LIGHTING APPLICATIONS, CREATIVITY, AND TECHNOLOGY
Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This survey course introduces students to the past, present, and foreseeable future of lighting, and to light as a design element: how culture, aesthetic preferences, social trends, energy, economics, and technology have and continue to influence the application of light and the development of illumination theory and equipment. Students will explore the genre of “Light Art,” an art form in which light is used as sculpture, or in which light, color, and shadow are primary elements of an artistic expression.

727 THE SCIENCE OF LIGHT
Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

The physics of light, its impact on design, and the fundamentals of human sight are explored, including optics, human photobiology, visual performance, spatial vision, visual comfort, color, electromagnetic energy, electricity, and the metrics of light.

729 LIGHTING DESIGN PROCESS
Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

Traditionally, design is a multiple-phase process. The focus of this course is the first phase of a project: initiating dialogue, establishing and documenting pertinent criteria, and formulating design objectives. Students will be introduced to how to examine strategies for identifying client needs, determine conceptual goals, identify design challenges, assess existing conditions, determine illumination levels, calculate power density and operating cost, and weigh the impact of energy code rules and regulations.

732 RENDERING AND REPRESENTATION FOR LIGHTING DESIGN
Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This course underscores the timeless idea of light as truly a designer’s medium by introducing students to the various techniques for representing and illustrating the transformative power of designed light. Through discussion, demonstrations, and assignments, students will explore a range of traditional and digital methods as a means of accurately depicting the modeling capabilities of light along the dimensions of form, texture, color, and brightness.

735 LIGHTING HISTORIC AND UNIQUE ENVIRONMENTS
Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

Lighting design for one-of-a-kind spaces and structures is challenging. Designers must acknowledge the limitations of construction and preservation requirements, yet recognize and celebrate the unique elements that require special attention. This course explores those challenges, through projects that require adaptive reuse, period restoration, or unconventional lighting solutions, and acquaints students with the techniques of researching equipment that is contextually appropriate, meets contemporary needs, and is suitable.

737 LIGHT SOURCE SELECTION AND EVALUATION
Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

The objective of this course is applying a balanced process that systematically and methodically determines the appropriate source of light for a given situation. Performance characteristics of technological light from legacy to new source types is presented. Students arrive at solutions by conducting reviews and assessments based on research and observation, and derived from comparative analysis using a variety of mathematical techniques.

740 LIGHTING DESIGN STUDIO I
Studio Credits: 4, No prerequisites

Students will develop lighting solutions for a variety of project types, building on knowledge gained in the program from previous or concurrent courses. They will develop and refine their ability to express their lighting design ideas graphically and verbally and will increase their proficiency in illuminating constructed environments. Industry professionals will be invited to provide feedback throughout the semester.

741 LUMINAIRE DESIGN
Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This course challenges students to research, design, and fabricate a working luminaire. The solutions are evaluated in terms of form, context, materials, workmanship, and above all, luminous presence. Topics include commercial luminaire design, and manufacturing, testing and safety, and other relevant aspects of fixture design.

744 LIGHTING CONTROLS AND SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY
Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

The success of sustainable design projects is directly linked to illumination quality, efficiency, and effectiveness. Students will be introduced to current and upcoming technologies as they consider the integration of intelligent and responsive lighting in the context of occupant/user interface, integration with digital infrastructure, and compatibility with construction.

745 RETAIL, ART AND EXHIBITION LIGHTING
Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

The compelling illumination of two-dimensional and three-dimensional objects within residential, commercial, retail, and exhibition environments requires knowledge of a wide range of issues including, preservation and flexibility, rendering and modeling, installation and maintenance, adjusting and fine tuning. Students will address these concerns as they develop appropriate solutions in a broad range of contexts.

750 LIGHTING DESIGN STUDIO II
Studio Credits: 4, No prerequisites

This course requires students to synthesize the knowledge and skills gained throughout the program to create comprehensive lighting design solutions for a variety of increasingly complex and specialized environments. Students are required to prepare presentation drawings, light maps, calculations, details, and specifications. Emphasis is placed on innovation through emerging technology and cutting edge industry practice. Industry professionals will be invited to provide feedback throughout the semester. Students are required as a condition of this course to display their projects in the annual spring graduate exhibition, along with selected examples of their exceptional work from other program courses.

759 THE BUSINESS OF LIGHT
Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This course provides students with an understanding of the lighting industry structure, and the mission and responsibilities of professional designers working as independent lighting consultants, or as lighting design team leaders within design. The roles of manufacturers, agencies, distributors, vendors/contractors, and professional member organizations and associations will be explored in depth. The course will cover topics such as contracts, specifications, and other business procedures, as well as project management, shop drawings review, mock-ups, and commissioning.

 

MPS in Sustainable Interior Environments

725 HISTORY AND THEORY OF SUSTAINABILITY IN THE INTERIOR ENVIRONMENT
Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

Students are introduced to the history and theory of sustainability and, through research and analysis, explore precedents in the vernacular and designed environment, as well as their relationship to the finite nature of our planet.

726 PRINCIPLES OF SUSTAINABLE DESIGN IN THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT
Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This course introduces students to the principles and concepts of sustainability and provides the context for design decisions for the twenty-first century. Students will develop an understanding of why current and future makers of the built environment must think differently than in the past and the reasons for both historical and current concerns about resource limitations. Class discussions will explore differing interpretations of the concept of sustainability and the broad range of factors contributing to a sustainable society, including, heath, productivity, and culture.

728 DESIGNING THE GREEN INTERIOR
Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This course examines the task of developing a sustainable project, and the various strategies for structuring the project team and work flow. The questions of who participates, what roles people play, and how the design process works in this new paradigm are covered, while introducing the purpose and practices leading to LEED certification.

733 SUSTAINABLE SOFT GOODS
Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This course examines both mass market and custom soft goods, and introduces students to the analytical methods for determining appropriate choices for designing and selecting soft goods for a sustainable interior. Upholstery frames, fillings, and finish textiles for furnishings, as well as window treatments and floor coverings are covered. Both new and remanufactured goods are explored, along with issues related to sourcing and transportation.

734 PRINCIPLES OF DAYLIGHTING
Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This course instructs designers in the analysis, evaluation, and manipulation of daylight, and its effect on the design and success of an interior space. Students will learn the methods of calculating the contributions of daylight, and its impact on space planning choices, interior finishes, as well as window options and interior daylight control.

736 MATERIALS AND FINISHES FOR THE SUSTAINABLE INTERIOR
Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This course instructs designers in the analysis, evaluation, and selection of construction and finish materials for the sustainable interior. Students will learn methods of determining material appropriateness and considerations when designing a green interior along with understanding the LEED rating system as applied to interior materials.

738 CONSTRUCTING THE GREEN INTERIOR
Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This course introduces students to strategies and procedures for implementing the green project, successful project management and builds on knowledge gained in 628 Designing the Green Interior. The collaborative roles of designer, architect, engineer, contractor, and owner, are explored, along with requirements leading to LEED Certification.

742 SUSTAINABLE STUDIO I: RESIDENTIAL ENVIRONMENTS
Studio Credits: 4, No prerequisites

Building on knowledge gained so far in the program and relating to other courses taken concurrently, this design studio focuses on the task of creating a sustainable residential interior. Working in teams, each group will design a residential project assigned from among varying types, from a free standing single family residence to a residence within a multiple dwelling, a residence created through adaptive reuse, or a residence for special populations including a dormitory, group home, or assisted living facility.

743 SUSTAINABLE HARD GOODS
Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This course examines both mass market and custom hard goods, and the methods for determining appropriate choices when designing or selecting hard goods for a sustainable interior. Both natural and manmade materials will be covered, as well as finishing processes. Through research and analysis students will become familiar with new and remanufactured goods, including issues related to sourcing, transportation, and LEED certification.

744 LIGHTING CONTROLS AND SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY
Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

The success of sustainable design projects is directly linked to illumination quality, efficiency, and effectiveness. Students will be introduced to current and upcoming technologies as they consider the integration of intelligent and responsive lighting in the context of occupant/user interface, integration with digital infrastructure, and compatibility with construction.

748 MAINTAINING THE GREEN INTERIOR
Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

Making an interior sustainable does not end on move in day. This course introduces students to the materials, methods, and strategies for creating a successful maintenance program for a variety of facility types, ensuring the endurance of the facility and its future as a sustainable environment. This course concludes with presentations devoted to the preparation for the LEED AP exam.

749 ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS FOR THE SUSTAINABLE INTERIOR
Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This course covers the methodologies for determining and maintaining comfortable conditions within buildings and focuses on efficient performance and systems integration. Students will gain knowledge of various building systems, methods for determining energy use, and the factors that contribute to a comfortable and sustainable interior. Case studies where students assess the success of various theoretical concepts and applications are included.

752 SUSTAINABLE STUDIO II: CONTRACT ENVIRONMENTS
Studio Credits: 4, No prerequisites

This capstone design studio focuses on the challenge of designing a sustainable contract interior. Working in teams, each group will be assigned a different contact project type including corporate, institutional, healthcare, hospitality, and retail. This project is presented to a graduate faculty jury and industry specialists for evaluation.

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